Why succession planning can be motivating

June 20, 2016

One of the greatest privileges of my life was to work alongside my father, and to help him retire both emotionally and financially successful (knowing his team and company would thrive without him).  So it may come as no surprise to find succession planning is close to our hearts at Aspirin Business. Read more

What motivates you to drive change in 2016?

June 20, 2016

At her debut Mindshop UK Conference for Business Advisors at the Waldorf Hilton Hotel in London, our Susannah Brade-Waring was asked to deliver a presentation on ‘What motivates you to drive change in 2016?” Read more

35% motivated or less! Take action.

April 16, 2016

Q&As for our Accredited Motivational Map Practitioners

by Susannah Brade-Waring, MD and Business Growth Coach & Facilitator at Aspirin Business Solutions

Map Action Zone

Q:  How do I provide feedback to someone with a very low Motivation Score, and how do I manage that within a Team Debrief?

A: Firstly – take heart.  Each time we’ve encountered this (which is about 2% of the time), the individual has confirmed the score accurately reflects their feelings.  So it’s not a surprise to them.  However, it can be a surprise to their manager, “If you’d asked us beforehand, we’d have said she was highly motivated.  She’s so bubbly and chatty.”

 

Let’s close out the Team De-brief first

We choose not to disclose personal Motivation details during team de-briefs.  We NEVER reveal an individual’s score, although they may choose to do so.  We only reveal an individual’s motivators (and de-motivators) with their permission.

So – what do we reveal?  The most common objective of a Team Motivational Maps Workshop is team-building, i.e. to increase the trust and understanding between team members.  Therefore, we:

  • reveal the motivators and de-motivators of the whole team,
  • (if it’s appropriate) their Motivation Score, and
  • their Change Index score (i.e. how change friendly or averse they are).

Then we discuss with the team how they can improve their own motivation, support each others’ motivation and how the motivators help and hinder achievement of their Team Objectives.

Keeping the Manager on-board

Sometimes it’s useful to state the obvious, just to reinforce or remind ourselves.  At the end of the day, it’s the manager’s team – so it’s our duty as coaches and trainers to keep the manager informed and on-board.

We always agree the way forward with the manager.  This is particularly important with someone’s whose motivation level is 35% or less (known in Motivational Map terms as ‘the Action Zone’), as it’s less easy to predict outcomes.

Finally, providing feedback to the individual

In our experience there are 3 typical reasons for a score that’s in the Action Zone, i.e. someone whose energy battery is only one-third full.

  1. They want to make a statement (not common, but it does happen).
  2. They genuinely don’t find their job fulfilling at a deep (soul, if you like) level, but they’re generally okay.
  3. They have significant challenges in their whole lives (including their personal lives) and, possibly, some level of depression.

In all 3 cases, the individual knows they’re not particularly happy.  As with all coaching, we know the answer lies within the individual, so we ask.  We ask if they’re surprised.  We ask what it means, or what’s happening?  And they tell us.

Our absolute Golden Rule, especially with Motivational Maps, is to be very respectful of the insight we’re privileged to have.  There are no rights or wrongs with the Motivational Maps (just one of the reasons we love them).  They are an accurate reflection of how the person is feeling, and we can help them to work WITH their motivators.  So, given the respect we show, the individuals open up and share what’s going on.  Now depending on how much they share and how quickly, will give you a rough indication of whether their reason is 1, 2 or 3.

  • Reason 1s will usually tell you straight away as they’re either looking for action, or they’re in the process of taking it.
  • Reason 2s will often offer to explain, and
  • Reason 3s will often talk around the subject, at least initially.

Then we rely on our skill and experience as coaches.

A few key points:

  1. The lowest possible Motivation Score on Motivational Maps is 10%.  So 35% or less, is very significant.
  2. People with this level of motivation have ‘allowed’ their motivation to get this low, indicating they don’t have the energy, the motivation or the strategies to know how to improve this.
  3. In our experience, Reason 2 and 3 individuals tend to stay with their current organisation.  It may be because they’re comfortable in their current roles, they like the organisation or have friends, or sometimes it’s because they don’t feel the need to be motivated at work – “It’s a job”, “I’m doing okay”, “I wouldn’t be here if I didn’t need to be.”
  4. Small changes – tweaks in job roles, extra support etc… don’t improve motivation at this level.  As one individual told her manager, “It’s not your job to motivate me.”  This came as a surprise, but a relief to him, as he really wanted to help.  She was basically saying, “There’s a bigger challenge here, and it’s mine to deal with.”  Helping these individuals to find their own solution, e.g. believing they can, is often the only way their motivation scores will improve.  Hence the requirement for highly-skilled coaching.

SIGNIFICANTLY, these individuals can be productive – hence why their managers are often surprised.  They can be delivering on their role and loved by their customers.  It’s just unlikely to last (because they can’t sustain the energy requirement), they’re more likely to have extended time off (because of their low energy and therefore resilience) AND they have so much more potential – if only they had more motivation.

For more information, or to talk through specific Motivational Maps in confidence, please get in touch.